A Simple Spy Story

We inhabit a world in which the forces of secrecy control information concerning our every day lives. We inhabit a world in which spy agencies constantly are invading our personal life in order to carry out allegedly important acts related to the every ominous, “security of the nation.” The spy agency alone decides what constitutes an issue of “national security” and whether or not anyone, and they mean, anyone has the right to know what they know. Professor Fransis Grosjean of the University of Neuchatel in Switzerland has been engaged for years in seeking information about his mother and father. His father was a French pilot who escaped the Germans and flew to France in 1940. He was asked by M15 to work for them. A German spy in England contacted the pilot and asked him to work for Germany. Professor Grosjean now believes his mother, who was then married to another man, divorced the man at the request of M15 and married his father. In other words, the professor and his sister were products of an M15 operation. His mother married his father in order to keep watch on his activities. After the war ended, she divorced him.

A simple request in 2004 to M15 about an event that occurred in 1941 met with the response from the spy agency, “any record we might have would be unlikely to be released in the foreseeable future.” They cited national security. All the professor wants to know is whether or not his mom worked for M15 and spied on his dad. According to M15: “it is longstanding policy not to confirm nor deny whether an individual was ever an agent.” I assume on grounds of national security.

Related Posts