Kuwait Cracking Down On Terrorism– Or Is It?

The Kuwait Ministry of Awqat and Islamic Affairs is launching a campaign to halt the spread of terrorism in its nation. From now on, it will “monitor” all speeches given in mosques by Imams and preachers which lean toward fostering feelings of anger and violence. Anyone who uses a mosque in order to preach about politics will be punished “suitably.” The Ministry of Education intends to educate youth about the dangers of extremism. “Most extremist organizations,” said a spokesperson, “target students, incite them and send them to Iraq and Afghanistan or to any other part of the world to wage Jihad.” The Awqat Ministry is determined that everything possible be done to ensure this culture not take root in Kuwait.

The assumption of Kuwait authorities is that some type of “education program” will deter young people from moving away from violence toward acceptance of the world in which they live. The root causes of Muslim youth deciding to participate in a “jihad” do not spring from lack of education, they arise from dissatisfaction with society or anger that those in authority are not adhering to the tenets of their religion. Although Kuwait has taken steps to expand the parameters of democracy, it still has a long way to go on this issue. Perhaps, if young people could participate in democratic encounters within their society, they might be less inclined to go on jihads. Muslim youth, like so many other young people in this world, are seeking justice and peace. One does not “educate” youth about democracy, one “practices democracy.”