Nativist Australian Bigots Oppose Muslim School

A large Islamic school was planned for a rural area outside of Sydney, but it has come into opposition from nativist residents who simply do not want Muslims in their area of the nation. The proposed primary and secondary school is designed to house about 600 Muslim students but neighbors are adamant they do not want the building. An online forum, www.australianidentity.net, open declares that “views, ideas and contributions that are hostile to (an Anglo-Celtic-European-white heritage) are not permitted on it received several postings about the proposed school. Darrin Hodges, of the Australian Protectionist Party, made clear “I will oppose mosques, sex-shops and any developments that undermine Australia’s traditional and family values.”

Ali Roude of the Islamic Council, points out there have been other schools that were built in the area without any parent opposition, and “it would appear that the real concerns and oppositions from locals has little to do with the merit of the project but more to do with general anti-Muslim sentiments.” Bigotry always uncovers a way to deny to minorities what is readily provided for those in the majority. It is the story of humankind.

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  • http://www.londonschoolofislamics.org.uk Iftikhar

    Muslim youths are angry, frustrated and extremist because they have been mis-educated and de-educated by the British schooling. Muslim children are confused because they are being educated in a wrong place at a wrong time in state schools with non-Muslim monolingual teachers. They face lots of problems of growing up in two distinctive cultural traditions and value systems, which may come into conflict over issues such as the role of women in the society, and adherence to religious and cultural traditions. The conflicting demands made by home and schools on behaviour, loyalties and obligations can be a source of psychological conflict and tension in Muslim youngsters. There are also the issues of racial prejudice and discrimination to deal with, in education and employment. They have been victim of racism and bullying in all walks of life. According to DCSF, 56% of Pakistanis and 54% of Bangladeshi children has been victims of bullies. The first wave of Muslim migrants were happy to send their children to state schools, thinking their children would get a much better education. Than little by little, the overt and covert discrimination in the system turned them off. There are fifteen areas where Muslim parents find themselves offended by state schools.

    The right to education in one’s own comfort zone is a fundamental and inalienable human right that should be available to all people irrespective of their ethnicity or religious background. Schools do not belong to state, they belong to parents. It is the parents’ choice to have faith schools for their children. Bilingual Muslim children need state funded Muslim schools with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods. There is no place for a non-Muslim teacher or a child in a Muslim school. There are hundreds of state schools where Muslim children are in majority. In my opinion, all such schools may be designated as Muslim community schools. An ICM Poll of British Muslims showed that nearly half wanted their children to attend Muslim schools. There are only 143 Muslim schools. A state funded Muslim school in Birmingham has 220 pupils and more than 1000 applicants chasing just 60.

    Majority of anti-Muslim stories are not about terrorism but about Muslim
    culture–the hijab, Muslim schools, family life and religiosity. Muslims in the west ought to be recognised as a western community, not as an alien culture.
    Iftikhar Ahmad
    http://www.londonschoolofislamics.org.uk

  • http://www.theimpudentobserver.com Fred Stopsky

    AS a child of immigrants I understand your concerns. Part of an immigration process is striking a balance between one’s values/culture and the national culture. Both are important. I believe public education must be free from ethnic, racial or religious influence.