Stop When I Say,Stop!

We live in the age of “stop and frisk.” Initially, that idea was introduced in an effort to identify potential criminals bent on robbing or murder or some form of horrible action. Once the concept of “terrorism” was introduced, the world entered a new era of what constitutes “suspicious” acts. Since the word, “terrorism” has multiple definitions and cannot be physically described, the only alternative is to ‘stop and frisk” anyone who challenges authority. David Miranda happens to be the partner of journalist Glenn Greenwald, who is known for his provocative analysis of American policies toward spying and snooping into the lives of people. So, let us introduce an old concept that worked rather well during the anti-communist hysteria of Joe McCarthy during the 1950s–”guilt by association.” Miranda was on his way through the Heathrow airport when halted by security police because he was close to Greenwald.

Miranda is arguing that his detention was illegal. He wants to establish the principle that just because I am close to a person who is disliked by authority, I am not guilty of anything other than having a friend you do not like.

Oh, the legal response was:”We assess that Miranda is knowingly carrying material, the release of which would endanger people’s lives.” So, how is this proven since nothing ever happened?