What Should Be US Foreign Policy?

The ongoing complaint of this blog is lack of a foreign policy on the part of the United States of America that goes beyond handling the current crisis of the day. Since the invasions of Afghanistan in 2001 and that of Iraq in 2003, American foreign policy essentially is based on the premise that our nation does not like bad people. We got rid of the bad Taliban, then we got rid of the bad Saddam Hussein, then we got rid of the bad Libyan dictator Gaddafi because he was bad–at least for this moment. America does not like Chinese leaders because they are dictatorial, but we DO like dictators in Saudi Arabia and in Egypt. I assume they are among the “good dictators.” The only clear aspect of US foreign policy over the past decade is our concern for “dictators.” Of course, even though we are against dictators, we really mean “some dictators.” From 1946 until 1991, American foreign policy was based on the theory of Çontainment. In the end, the Soviet Union imploded, and Çontainment wound up proving accurate as a foreign policy.

What then can be a foreign policy for the Middle East?

1. Our goal should be creation of a Mediterranean Union that includes all nations in the region.

2. Creation of the MU should not be predicated on the assumption that all nations participating in the Union were, at this moment, democracies.

3. Our goal should be an Israel agreement with Palestinian leaders that results in formation of an independent state of Palestine which governs 95% of the existing West Bank and Gaza.

4. The US should take the lead in creating a modern Marshall Plan for the MU to stimulate economic development.

These four goals have nothing to do with democracy. The end result of this policy would be peace in the region and economic development. Period!